The Washington Secretaries History Project   
Gallery
Toni DeTuncq holds what
began as a baby blanket
she crocheted during the
lengthy Watergate
investigation which
brought White House
operations to a halt in 1973.

Toni was a secretary in the
speechwriting department
and expecting her first
child. "Henry Kissinger
would visit the office and
say, 'I have a feeling I'll
come in one day and you'll
be under the blanket, still
crocheting.'"

Now: Corporate
consultant, author and
speaker specializing in ROI
(return on investment).
Clients include the World
Bank, the United Nations,
NASA & the Goddard
Space Flight Center,
the U.S. Army, NSA
(National Security
Agency), ASTD (American
Society for Training &
Development),  Blue
Cross/Blue Shield,
Bank of America, BMW
Manufacturing,  Raytheon
and Nextel
Communications.
Lillian Cox, Secretary,
Speechwriting Dept.,
The White House, 1973

Now: Journalist &
Founder, The Washington
Secretaries History
Project
After graduating from
college in 1971, Susan
Foster took a job on Capitol
Hill where she was featured
in the "Hill Pinup" section of
the February 3, 1972 issue of
Roll Call (pictured).

She was soon recruited to
be a  legislative aide in the
office of Cong. William J.
Keating, a Republican from
Ohio.  She was told she was
the first woman on Capitol
Hill to hold the position.
There was one problem:
Keating's administrative
aide was embarrassed to
tell her that Speaker of the
House Gerald  Ford did not
allow women to attend
meetings for legislative
aides. Susan tried anyway,
and was turned away at the
door.

Now: Medical Social
Worker (MSW), researcher
and author specializing in
dangers of cell phone
technology.

Recipient,  "2003 Hero's
Award for Protecting Health
and Safety of Firefighters,"
San Diego Fire Department.
Donna Lee worked in the
office of Sen. John Tower
(R-Texas) (pictured) beginning
in 1961, and Sen. Peter
Dominick [R-Colo.] in 1963.

Donna said she knew she
wanted to work on Capitol Hill
after visiting Washington, D.C.
in 1960 while her stepmother,
actress Gene Tierney, was
making the classic film,
"Advise & Consent" with
Charles Laughton, Henry Fonda
and Walter Pidgeon.

Now: Retired, real estate.